Yes, your Bitcoin transactions can be tracked – Here’s how

r/Bitcoin recap - January 2018

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the thirteenth monthly Bitcoin news recap. I must say it's becoming pretty hard to select just 1 or 2 stories per day, too much is going on!
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in the Bitcoin space over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in January 2018
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Crypto Month in Review - March 2018

Previous reviews: Jan, Feb Crypto moves way too fast for me to keep up, so I aggregate each day's biggest headline and publish the list at the end of the month. Below is my list for March. My main news source was reddit. My main holdings are ETH and NANO, but I try to make these lists as unbiased as possible. As requested by you guys, I have included source links to each of these headlines. I also took a screenshot of the market cap movement throughout the month that you can see here. To speak to March in particular - even though we are in a bear market right now, and the first half of the month had pretty negative headlines, hopefully the many promising headlines in the 2nd half of the list will help assure you that distributed ledger technology is only becoming more adopted and embedded in society with each passing day. 3/1 - Oyster Pearl completes a coin burn of 10% of its total supply. This comes one day after they released their testnet. 3/2 - TechCrunch founder Michael Arrington is subpoenaed by the Securites and Exchange Commision over his $100 million cryptocurrency fund. 3/3 - A class-action lawsuit is filed against Coinbase alleging insider trading prior to Bitcoin Cash trading going live on their exchange. 3/4 - An anonymous person publishes a pastebin document detailing a FUD campaign by CoinDesk backers Digital Currency Group against IOTA. 3/5 - Coinbase hires former LinkedIn exec Emilie Choi to serve as VP of corporate & business development, with an emphasis on “world-class acquisition and partnership opportunities”. 3/6 - WaltonChain subsidiary ZhongChuan IoT and Alibaba Cloud sign a strategic partnership to research Smart City solutions and blockchain application schemes. 3/7 - A rogue actor who had been phishing Binance accounts uses the victims’ funds to pump the price of Viacoin. Withdrawals on Binance were automatically frozen, and the hacker’s transactions were later rolled back. 3/8 - Sierra Leone, in conjunction with blockchain voting startup Agora, records the world’s first ever presidential election on a blockchain. (NOTE: This claim has now been rejected by the Sierra Leone government.) 3/9 - Security researchers at the University of Toronto catch the Egyptian government remotely hijacking citizens’ computers to covertly mine Monero. 3/10 - Reports reveal that Google has been quietly purging cryptocurrency ads, mainly those for ICOs, under pressure from the FBI. The FBI also convinced Facebook to do the same thing in February. 3/11 - Binance posts a $250,000 bounty for information that leads to the arrest of the perpetrators of the March 7th hack. 3/12 - John Oliver explains Bitcoin and blockchain to a global audience and pens his #CraefulGang movement while condemning projects such as EOS and Bitconnect on his CNN show Last Week Tonight. 3/13 - VeChain announces a partnership with Chinese supply chain risk management company LogSafer. 3/14 - In the wake of John Oliver’s cryptocurrency segment in which EOS spokesperson Brock Pierce’s questionable past was outlined, EOS decides to cut ties with him, scrubbing their site and YouTube channel of any reference to him. 3/15 - Bitcoin core devs release a beta version of the Lightning network to the mainnet. 3/16 - The 2018 Joint Economic Committee Report dedicates an entire section to the rise of cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology. 3/17 - Bitmain announces a new mining machine, the antminer 3x, that is primarily designed to mine Monero. The Monero community claims that they will render the miner useless with an upcoming fork. 3/18 - At the G20 summit, the Financial Security board opines that crypto-assets do not pose a risk to global financial stability, and that further regulations at this time would not be necessary. 3/19 - Businessman and Shark Tank investor Kevin O’Leary announces his plan to work with the SEC to issue a cryptocurrency that will act as stock for a $400 million dollar hotel company. He also states that asset-based coins will eventually replace small-cap stocks. 3/20 - Nano releases their developer road map, revealing that they have a point of sale payment system in alpha stages of testing. 3/21 - A DDoS attack against the Bitcoin Lightning Network brings 20% of its nodes down. 3/22 - Yahoo Japan announces that it is acquiring Japanese exchange BitARG and will launch its own exchange in 2019. 3/23 - After uncertain talks with Hong Kong regulators, Binance announces that it is moving to Malta. It also reveals plans to allow users to buy crypto with fiat directly. 3/24 - Santander announces plans to launch an international money transfer app that will run on Ripple. 3/25 - The Coinbase logo is spotted in the new intro to HBO show Silicon Valley. 3/26 - Coinbase announces incoming support for ERC20 tokens without specifying which tokens it will list. 3/27 - Stephen Colbert announces on his show that Ripple has donated $26 million in XRP to DonorsChoose.org . 3/28 - Decentralized payment network OmiseGo and Ethereum cofounder Vitalik Buterin donate $1 million via GiveDirectly to support Ugandan refugees. 3/29 - Cryptocurrency exchange and Tether backer Bitfinex announces imminent fiat markets for BTC, ETH, NEO, IOTA, and EOS. They will fully support British Pounds and Japanese Yen, and offer partial support for the Euro. 3/30 - P2P payment platform Request Network goes live on the Ethereum mainnet. 3/31 - WaltonChain announces the launch of its mainnet, featuring a wallet with “1-click” mining.
submitted by m1kec1av to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: btc top posts from 2018-04-20 to 2018-05-20 06:58 PDT

Period: 29.85 days
Submissions Comments
Total 1000 53623
Rate (per day) 33.50 1780.26
Unique Redditors 466 5134
Combined Score 118969 219877

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 7839 points, 57 submissions: MemoryDealers
    1. If all the 32MB blocks were permanently 100% full, this $400 hard drive could store the blockchain for the next 7 years. (373 points, 352 comments)
    2. The people behind Bitcoin Cash are the ones who created Bitcoin's network effect in the first place. (357 points, 123 comments)
    3. Bitcoin subscribers are now calling for people to report Bitcoin.com to the Internet Crime Complaint Center of the FBI. It's sad that BTC supporters all seem to be statists who yell about hodling their muh store of value all day. (348 points, 288 comments)
    4. I have more emails saved on my computer than the entire BTC or BCH block chains. (319 points, 131 comments)
    5. Bitcoin.com is now sponsoring pro female MMA athletes. (293 points, 121 comments)
    6. CoinGeek will support Bitcoin.com in lawsuit over the real Bitcoin - Coingeek (273 points, 354 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Cash is now on iOS in the world’s most popular crypto wallet. #winning (257 points, 131 comments)
    8. "The vast majority of mining hash power was controlled by people who were psychologically incapable of disobedience to perceived authority." -Mike Hearn (250 points, 194 comments)
    9. "BTC True Believers" Are Boycotting the First National Talk Radio Show that ever Discussed Bitcoin because they accept BCH payments. (245 points, 116 comments)
    10. All I keep hearing is that Bitcoin Cash is an infested cesspool of lawless, leaderless, disrespectful, narcissistic, greedy, scammy, capitalistic anarchists that will never create digital money! I swear I’m getting dejavu! (225 points, 46 comments)
  2. 3965 points, 19 submissions: hunk_quark
    1. Warren Buffet's Berkshire is the single largest stockholder in BoA and WellsFargo. In case you were wondering about his attitude towards Bitcoin. (614 points, 114 comments)
    2. Purse.io is paying its employees in Bitcoin Cash. (447 points, 63 comments)
    3. Shoutout to Kraken for standing up to NY Attorney General. If Schneiderman wants transparency and accountability he should be looking into auditing the fed. (406 points, 28 comments)
    4. Bitcoin is rat poison. The bankers are the rats. (404 points, 56 comments)
    5. Forbes Author Frances Coppola takes blockstream to task. (364 points, 35 comments)
    6. Purse CEO Andrew Lee confirms they are paying employees in BCH and native BCH integration update will be coming soon! (343 points, 43 comments)
    7. PSA: So called 'low-fee' cryptocurrency Litecoin has transaction fees 20x higher than Bitcoin Cash (264 points, 80 comments)
    8. After today's BCH Upgrade, longer posts are now enabled on memo.cash! (250 points, 31 comments)
    9. Jeffrey Tucker is promoting bitcoin.com at Atlanta Bitcoin Embassy. (195 points, 57 comments)
    10. Anti-Bitcoiners, life comes at you fast! (109 points, 26 comments)
  3. 3846 points, 30 submissions: Kain_niaK
    1. Bitcoin Cash has not only removed the cap on transactions but also the cap on development. Something new pops up every time I blink. (368 points, 162 comments)
    2. I am getting flashbacks from when I tried to close my Bank of America account ... (353 points, 155 comments)
    3. Fucking /bitcoin assholes reported my twitter account and now I need to verify with a phone number before I can continue with twitter. (325 points, 218 comments)
    4. Paul Wasensteiner: When is @Twitter going to fix the abuse of the report button by @bitcoincoreorg supporters? Why are supporters of a supposedly censorship-resistant money using censorship at every opportunity? (295 points, 106 comments)
    5. We should pirate the entire piratebay.org website and all it's functionality directly on to the Bitcoin Cash blockchain. The piratebay.org is just magnet links and comments. Then they will say bcash stole our business ... (232 points, 439 comments)
    6. Fees higher than a dollar cent or waiting times longer than a couple of seconds defeat the entire purpose of why Bitcoin was invented. (218 points, 164 comments)
    7. moneybutton.com is a configurable client-side Bitcoin Cash (BCH) wallet in an iframe. When the user makes a payment, a webhook URL is called allowing your app to respond to the payment, such as displaying content behind a pay wall. (189 points, 37 comments)
    8. We proudly present BCHpizza.org! Now the community can create city bounties for pizza shops to incentivize them to accept Bitcoin Cash. First pizza shop in a city to do so gets the bounty! (177 points, 117 comments)
    9. Bitcoin Cash can turn in to the biggest non violent protest against the establishment ever : "We simply stop using their money." Which is a great way of getting edgy teenagers to join us. There is an almost infinite supply of edgy teenagers in the world. (156 points, 42 comments)
    10. We need testers for the Cash Shuffle plugin. (121 points, 17 comments)
  4. 3666 points, 28 submissions: Windowly
    1. "Billion-dollar corporations take note: Bitcoin Cash is open for business! Just try to fill up our blocks, I dare you. There will be no "Fidelity Effect" with BCH. Unlike BTC, we want you to use the Blockchain. BCH never really hits a scale ceiling."~Dr. Peter Rizun (415 points, 177 comments)
    2. "In a discussion group of BCH, lots of investors concerned about the address confusing problem. BCH community should push every software of ecosystem to upgrade to Cashaddr ASAP."~Jihan Wu (366 points, 215 comments)
    3. "Maybe the best way to bring economic freedom to the world is to make an uncensorable Twitter."~Ryan X. Charles (300 points, 114 comments)
    4. Newbie tip! Do yourself a favor, get a Protonmail email account and switch all your crypto exchanges to that email. No reason Google/Gmail need to have your entire crypto history at their fingertips. (299 points, 133 comments)
    5. "On the 15th of May, I'll be popping the champagne, not to celebrate high fees, but to celebrate continued low fees, privacy enablements, smart contract capabilities, and PayPal level throughput capability."~Eli Afram (233 points, 46 comments)
    6. 24% of the trading on GDAX in the last 24 hours was for Bitcoin Cash (BCH)! 😊💃 (185 points, 16 comments)
    7. Yeah!! "We are pleased to announce that the new Bitcoin Cash address format has been implemented on QuadrigaCX. This will help our users to easily distinguish Bitcoin and Bitcoin Cash addresses when funding/withdrawing their account. The BCH legacy addresses will still be supported." (165 points, 8 comments)
    8. ANNOUNCE: Coinbase has blocked the official @WikiLeaks shop from its platform without notice or explanation. You can continue to donate #Bitcoin to WikiLeaks at https://WikiLeaks.org/donate . (164 points, 55 comments)
    9. There is a Bitcoin Unlimited election today. (BU is one of the 6+ development teams that develop clients for Bitcoin Cash (BCH). BU has a unique governance system where developers are not king. . instead members vote on proposals. If you are a member, please vote! (161 points, 29 comments)
    10. Bitpay Adds Bitcoin Cash Support to Checkout Point-of-Sale App - Bitcoin News (151 points, 22 comments)
  5. 2565 points, 15 submissions: BitcoinXio
    1. Bitcoin Cash is upgrading on May 15 to 32MB max block limit (575 points, 335 comments)
    2. Frances Coppola on Twitter: “Congratulations, Blockstream, you have just reinvented the interbank lending market.” (411 points, 139 comments)
    3. Once again Core supporters threaten with lawsuits and government intervention to try to get their way. This is just pathetic and not the foundations of what Bitcoin was built on. These are not bitcoiners. (299 points, 355 comments)
    4. Get ready - Bitcoin Cash is upgrading on May 15th! (198 points, 132 comments)
    5. CobraBitcoin: "Lightning is cool, but nobody should be recommending it to actual merchants for at least the next few years. Merchants like Steam already got hurt by adopting Bitcoin and regretting it later. Lightning needs time to mature and prove itself. Mad hype to rush adoption will harm it." (157 points, 58 comments)
    6. Blockchain on Twitter: “What's that you see? It's all your BCH that now appears in your #ios wallet. Take control of your financial future and #beyourownbank today.” (138 points, 20 comments)
    7. We are living in the digital age of information, which is why censorship has become such an important issue [...] That’s why I’m excited about decentralized social networks built on top of Bitcoin Cash like @BlockPressApp & @memobch. They are new so need work, but the path is being paved. (131 points, 31 comments)
    8. BlockPress published its protocol (123 points, 22 comments)
    9. We have a new alternative public mod logs (96 points, 35 comments)
    10. If Bitcoin Core (BTC) is no longer usable by many people in the world due to being out priced (high tx fees), is it still “borderless”? I’d argue that it’s no longer borderless if people all over the world are excluded from the network. (95 points, 34 comments)
  6. 2030 points, 11 submissions: tralxz
    1. Breaking News: Winklevoss Brothers Bitcoin Exchange Adds Bitcoin Cash support! (508 points, 115 comments)
    2. Jihan Wu was asked "Why are the miners still supporting Bitcoin Core? Is it just a short term profitability play?", he answered: "Yes, exactly." (279 points, 215 comments)
    3. Cobra:"That feeling when Blockstream, [...] release Liquid, a completely centralized sidechain run only by trusted nodes and designed for banks, financial institutions and exchanges." (245 points, 145 comments)
    4. LibreOffice Foundation accepts Bitcoin Cash donations. (191 points, 11 comments)
    5. Breaking News! Vin Armani: "Major mining pools have agreed to establish a treasury and start funding $BCH development from their block rewards. HUGE!!!" (186 points, 80 comments)
    6. CNBC's Fast Money: Ran NeuNer says he would HODL Bitcoin Cash and sell Bitcoin Core. (172 points, 59 comments)
    7. Jihan Wu on Bloomberg predicting Bitcoin Cash at $100,000 USD in 5 years. (172 points, 65 comments)
    8. Let's start the Bitcoin Cash upgrade party. New era for BCH is coming May 15. Privacy tools + smart contracts + PayPal capacity handling. Exciting times ahead! (106 points, 37 comments)
    9. Coindesk: "Florida Tax Collector to Accept Bitcoin, Bitcoin Cash Payments" (60 points, 8 comments)
    10. Adam B.: "Bitcoin is not a democracy". The authoritarian moves by Core makes perfect sense now. (59 points, 46 comments)
  7. 1485 points, 12 submissions: jonald_fyookball
    1. BTCers fundraise for frivolous lawsuit. BCH fundraises to feed Venezuelans. (233 points, 58 comments)
    2. bitcoin admits: best way to use Lightning Network: don't use it. (189 points, 286 comments)
    3. Electron Cash 3.2 is available. Includes new op-codes and fixes for Ledger hardware wallet (180 points, 50 comments)
    4. If you have to call it bcash you've already lost the argument (164 points, 257 comments)
    5. Cash Shuffle plugin 0.2 - Cash Shuffle development continues (131 points, 37 comments)
    6. Claims that BCH is a "centralized coin" are exaggerations at best. (114 points, 83 comments)
    7. (shitpost) philosoraptor meme: if honeybadger don't care... (106 points, 22 comments)
    8. BCH being a minority chain may be a blessing in disguise (97 points, 83 comments)
    9. Another reason to be bullish on BCH (92 points, 18 comments)
    10. BCHpizza already has 4 bounties posted. It's also no longer needed to sign a message to post a bounty. (89 points, 21 comments)
  8. 1393 points, 8 submissions: rdar1999
    1. Naomi Brockwell on Twitter: "[I] won’t succumb to censorship through intimidation." (332 points, 190 comments)
    2. Consensus 2018 sucked hard. Superficial talks, ridiculous ticket price, overcrowded venue. (233 points, 78 comments)
    3. ==> Becash or Begone: reclaiming the "bcash" trolling (213 points, 107 comments)
    4. See in this twitter thread Luke Jr actually arguing that PayPal is cheaper than BCH!! Is this guy in full delirium? Or just spouts misinformation on purpose? (172 points, 227 comments)
    5. ///\ BTC-BCH persists as the most popular trade on ShapeShift.io /// (171 points, 20 comments)
    6. The retard tribalism is so real. SBI japan's financial giant says they will launch a platform with BCH as settlement coin (due to BTC being bad) and XRP as remittances. I provide the link and cryptocurrency shills deny plain literally declared fact. (124 points, 50 comments)
    7. Chris DeRose on Twitter: "So if Roger ver wins the class action lawsuit, I assume that Bitcoin cash can then rightfully sue Bitcoin core proponents for fraud?" (92 points, 61 comments)
    8. Upgrade completed at height 530356! (56 points, 2 comments)
  9. 1377 points, 12 submissions: Egon_1
    1. Genesis Mining:"We are more than happy to announce that Bitcoin Cash is now available as a Native Mining option for all Bitcoin (Sha256) contracts!" (287 points, 22 comments)
    2. Jihan Wu on BCH Lighthouse:”This project was abandoned on BTC Blockchain long time ago, it is very excited to see it is alive again on BCH Blockchain. It can be very huge.” (278 points, 50 comments)
    3. Yahoo Finance: "Bitcoin Goes Lateral as Bitcoin Cash Steals the Show… AGAIN" (189 points, 46 comments)
    4. "Bitcoin Cash is actually more interesting ..." (119 points, 15 comments)
    5. Jeff Garzik:"Just got an earful from a Chicago cabbie, on $LTC He was very grumpy at @SatoshiLite selling, saying it indicated a lack of founder's confidence in his own creation. #StreetCrypto" (100 points, 8 comments)
    6. “Why don't we start saying: "Bitcoin is Cash" It's much harder to refute than "Bitcoin Cash IS Bitcoin"“ (75 points, 49 comments)
    7. "Because Bitcoin Cash is effectively Bitcoin ✌️ (72 points, 22 comments)
    8. Bye Bye P2P Electronic Cash ... (68 points, 88 comments)
    9. Bitcoin.com Wallet needs more useful services integrated... beyond Shapeshift (59 points, 24 comments)
    10. BCH keeps bitcoins minions busy (48 points, 28 comments)
  10. 1291 points, 9 submissions: increaseblocks
    1. Vitalik Buterin says what we've all been saying - CoinDesk is scammy and complicit bad actor in the cryptocurrency world and should be shunned (510 points, 61 comments)
    2. Bitcoin Wallet Mycelium Begins Rolling Out Bitcoin Cash BCH Support (163 points, 39 comments)
    3. Cheddr is a Bitcoin Cash Point Of Sale system that runs in most modern browsers - no server infrastructure required (137 points, 31 comments)
    4. Leaked Telegram chat shows bitcoin.com "fraud" lawsuit was abandoned due to lack of support 😂😂😂 (135 points, 32 comments)
    5. Toshi to expand beyond Ethereum - will add Bitcoin Cash (91 points, 7 comments)
    6. Litecoin transaction fees 20 times higher than Bitcoin Cash (85 points, 44 comments)
    7. DAMN BCH! (68 points, 25 comments)
    8. In honor of the Bitcoin Cash successful upgrade and now we have the true lightning network. I present to you lightningnetwork.cash! (58 points, 22 comments)
    9. Bcore shills are crying right now 😭😭😂😂 (44 points, 10 comments)
  11. 1202 points, 9 submissions: SharkLaserrrrr
    1. Memo is now open source! (361 points, 160 comments)
    2. Based on @BitcoinCashFund report, preliminary calculation: Total spent: $153,138.49 Total spent on Salaries and Travel: $101,996.79 ~66% of donations is spent on themselves, charities/non-profits (official registered ones) limit themselves to less than 10% (161 points, 181 comments)
    3. [PREVIEW] Looks like Lighthouse powered by Bitcoin Cash is coming together nicely thanks to the hard work of an anonymous developer. I wonder how Mike Hearn feels about his project being resurrected. (159 points, 24 comments)
    4. We heard you want a Bitcoin Cash exclusive wallet that uses ‘bits’ and enables you to buy anything online and pay with Bitcoin Cash so we are building one #cashpay #CryptonizeYourPurchases (137 points, 77 comments)
    5. Bitcoin Cash is the real Bitcoin experience. If you have any doubts, go buy something on cryptonize.it, then buy something off a Lightning store and compare what you had to go through to pay for your order. (103 points, 51 comments)
    6. As of today, cryptonize.it shows prices in Bitcoin Cash next to fiat! (81 points, 9 comments)
    7. Incompatible protocols gave us the ’90s web which was not a pretty sight. Let’s not repeat the same mistakes when building censorship resisted social media powered by Bitcoin Cash. Support @MemoBCH protocol. (72 points, 57 comments)
    8. To help developers raise funds, cryptonize.it is sponsoring a Lighthouse server and website so useful projects can be funded by the community directly. (66 points, 7 comments)
    9. $25,- Amazon gift cards back in store, 0-conf. instant delivery, the real bitcoin experience (62 points, 18 comments)
  12. 1189 points, 1 submission: ocist1121
    1. No spend (1189 points, 87 comments)
  13. 1148 points, 6 submissions: BeijingBitcoins
    1. Three years ago today, Mike Hearn published an article explaining exactly what would happen when the 1MB blocksize limit was hit. He was right on all counts. (473 points, 173 comments)
    2. An easy way to visualize the August 1st Hard Fork. Neither of the two branches resulting from a fork can be called "the original road," but only one branch continues towards the same destination. (163 points, 140 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Core fanatics are trying to organize a lawsuit against Bitcoin.com for using the term "Bitcoin (BCH)", while they run around all day labelling it "Bcash" (157 points, 167 comments)
    4. "Bitcoin Cash won't "fork" in May. Instead, Bitcoin Cash will just upgrade." (123 points, 53 comments)
    5. Just launched: Satoshi Pulse, by Bitcoin.com (121 points, 44 comments)
    6. Ryan Charles delivers an epic rant about Lightning Network problems (111 points, 19 comments)
  14. 1085 points, 10 submissions: unitedstatian
    1. Reminder: Blockstream plans to make money from the proprietary solutions it sells, which is why it moved away from the free permissionless blockchain to an abstracted layer on top which requires 3rd party solutions to be cost effective for most users. (220 points, 146 comments)
    2. It seems there's been a massive propaganda campaign to brainwash people into thinking hardforks are bad. (180 points, 56 comments)
    3. BCH could really be missing the new big use case. Gamers would love to have real ownership of game items. The first game which will integrate a digital coin and make it popular will be groundbreaking. (141 points, 76 comments)
    4. The guy had 350 bucks received via Lightning Network but he can't even close the channels to actually withdraw the bitcoins. (139 points, 188 comments)
    5. What gives Core the right to change the model so drastically and still keep the brand name? (119 points, 117 comments)
    6. One of the most ignorant - even anti-crypto - argument I hear around is that BCH is a currency controlled by Chinese miners. (88 points, 74 comments)
    7. The first megabytes are far more crucial than the 100th. Not every MB was born equal and by giving up on adoption for years Core may have given up on adoption forever. (69 points, 20 comments)
    8. In light of the recent ERC-20 bug I think this is a good time to remember these wise words (54 points, 25 comments)
    9. If BCH had decent privacy features it'd gain so much more market share. It's hard to compete with privacy-always-on coins such as XMR but many more coins offer moderate privacy and would be easy to beat. (42 points, 31 comments)
    10. If Memo taught me one thing it's the more uses around the coin the better - can BCH be adopted to help fight counterfeiting? (33 points, 4 comments)
  15. 1055 points, 5 submissions: ForkiusMaximus
    1. MortuusBestia hits on a pitch-perfect way of looking at BCH's value proposition in epic comment on /BitcoinMarkets (604 points, 109 comments)
    2. I am excited that BCH is being irrationally criticized, because it reminds me of 2011 and 2012 when Bitcoin was being irrationally criticized. Any of 2013, when the price rose 100x. (183 points, 82 comments)
    3. Japanese tweeter makes a good point about BTC: "You don't call it an asset if it crumbles away every time you go to use it. You call it a consumable." (144 points, 21 comments)
    4. Jimmy Nguyen: Bitcoin Cash can function for higher level technical programming (80 points, 3 comments)
    5. How NOT to tell which is "the real Bitcoin" (44 points, 15 comments)
  16. 1032 points, 6 submissions: theantnest
    1. Let's start a class action lawsuit against Canada for calling their currency the dollar. I accidentally bought CAD when I wanted USD, and didn't know I could just exchange it again. (511 points, 243 comments)
    2. BTC noobs conned into being concerned about node count to distract them from the real centralization problem: (137 points, 172 comments)
    3. Any real scientist interested in Bitcoin should be happy Bitcoin Cash exists. (110 points, 40 comments)
    4. Blockstream shill admits to exaggerating and slandering Roger purely because he doesn't support BTC. (103 points, 49 comments)
    5. Cognitive Dissonance: It's totally fine to call BCH 'bcash', but it's fraudulent to call it Bitcoin? (93 points, 51 comments)
    6. Be Cash! (78 points, 45 comments)
  17. 1029 points, 7 submissions: zhell_
    1. MEMO NOW SUPPORTS REPLIES, join the Party now ! (208 points, 50 comments)
    2. memo.cash has been generating 2000 tx/day since its start, which is near 10% of all transactions on the BCH network. (201 points, 73 comments)
    3. "Money comes from being the most tradable of all commodities" Austrian Economics (189 points, 104 comments)
    4. Fiat is crashing: Inflation in the US averages at 10%/year in the past 5 years when measured as the price of the top 500 items on which Americans spend their after-tax dollars. (183 points, 49 comments)
    5. Memo.cash breaks a record with 3000 on-chain actions in the last 24h after implementing replies (143 points, 25 comments)
    6. with 2k tx/day, memo.cash is only using ~0.09% of 8MB blocks capacity currently on the BCH network (that would be 0.02% of 32MB blocks) (69 points, 3 comments)
    7. Help! I bought what I thought was Bitcoin and it is now gone! /s (36 points, 8 comments)
  18. 1020 points, 4 submissions: Anenome5
    1. Let's End the War and focus on the TRUE ENEMY (719 points, 349 comments)
    2. Satoshi's original whitepaper talks about "Reclaiming Disk Space" by pruning transactions, what's being done on this front? Core-trolls say we don't need to store forever that you bought a coffee, and that's true, and Satoshi also proposed how to fix that long ago. (200 points, 166 comments)
    3. Core'er says $50 fees "a wtf moment for everyone" but doubts it will ever happen again. Seems they're in for a surprise, BTC is still extremely vulnerable to transaction-fee price-inflation due to low capacity. BTC transaction fees currently 19+ times higher than BCH. (65 points, 30 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Cash, the early years... [OC] (36 points, 16 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. jessquit (3904 points, 368 comments)
  2. Kain_niaK (3058 points, 684 comments)
  3. bambarasta (2674 points, 360 comments)
  4. H0dl (2352 points, 464 comments)
  5. rdar1999 (2352 points, 404 comments)
  6. BitttBurger (2301 points, 313 comments)
  7. Adrian-X (2118 points, 506 comments)
  8. MemoryDealers (2084 points, 102 comments)
  9. trolldetectr (2073 points, 502 comments)
  10. LexGrom (2055 points, 709 comments)
  11. Ant-n (1834 points, 334 comments)
  12. LovelyDay (1820 points, 468 comments)
  13. jimbtc (1734 points, 212 comments)
  14. fruitsofknowledge (1618 points, 469 comments)
  15. ForkiusMaximus (1612 points, 211 comments)
  16. unstoppable-cash (1537 points, 201 comments)
  17. unitedstatian (1485 points, 388 comments)
  18. jonald_fyookball (1481 points, 142 comments)
  19. Bitcoinopoly (1471 points, 175 comments)
  20. BeijingBitcoins (1430 points, 100 comments)
  21. KoKansei (1330 points, 84 comments)
  22. MobTwo (1309 points, 93 comments)
  23. btcnewsupdates (1263 points, 153 comments)
  24. lubokkanev (1252 points, 298 comments)
  25. BitcoinXio (1251 points, 76 comments)
  26. taipalag (1248 points, 250 comments)
  27. mrtest001 (1075 points, 271 comments)
  28. LuxuriousThrowAway (1072 points, 163 comments)
  29. MarchewkaCzerwona (1046 points, 119 comments)
  30. cbeaks (985 points, 175 comments)
  31. SharkLaserrrrr (976 points, 135 comments)
  32. tippr (974 points, 523 comments)
  33. knight222 (963 points, 132 comments)
  34. PsyRev_ (941 points, 189 comments)
  35. radmege (919 points, 62 comments)
  36. Anenome5 (914 points, 182 comments)
  37. Churn (886 points, 75 comments)
  38. 324JL (855 points, 200 comments)
  39. emergent_reasons (854 points, 143 comments)
  40. TiagoTiagoT (841 points, 320 comments)
  41. bahkins313 (831 points, 121 comments)
  42. silverjustice (825 points, 62 comments)
  43. cryptorebel (812 points, 148 comments)
  44. scotty321 (811 points, 121 comments)
  45. DaSpawn (808 points, 113 comments)
  46. homopit (795 points, 100 comments)
  47. AcerbLogic (786 points, 205 comments)
  48. normal_rc (777 points, 59 comments)
  49. fiah84 (774 points, 136 comments)
  50. Deadbeat1000 (753 points, 61 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. No spend by ocist1121 (1189 points, 87 comments)
  2. 1 For whoever questions the utility of Bitcoin, here's banking summarized accurately by rlibec (783 points, 163 comments)
  3. Let's End the War and focus on the TRUE ENEMY by Anenome5 (719 points, 349 comments)
  4. Am I the only one that doesn't mind Bitcoin Cash being called "Bitcoin Cash" instead of just "Bitcoin" (for now)? by d3on (672 points, 401 comments)
  5. Warren Buffet's Berkshire is the single largest stockholder in BoA and WellsFargo. In case you were wondering about his attitude towards Bitcoin. by hunk_quark (614 points, 114 comments)
  6. MortuusBestia hits on a pitch-perfect way of looking at BCH's value proposition in epic comment on /BitcoinMarkets by ForkiusMaximus (604 points, 109 comments)
  7. coincall.io labels BCH a "shitcoin" by groovymash (586 points, 329 comments)
  8. Erik Voorhees: “Roger - please stop referencing me to back up your opinion that Bitcoin Cash is Bitcoin. It isn't. Bitcoin is the chain originating from the genesis block with the highest accumulated proof of work. The Bitcoin Cash fork failed to gain majority, thus it is not Bitcoin.” by sumsaph (585 points, 547 comments)
  9. Can’t believe this was available. My new license plate.. by VanquishAudio (581 points, 113 comments)
  10. Bitcoin Cash is upgrading on May 15 to 32MB max block limit by BitcoinXio (575 points, 335 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 322 points: rdar1999's comment in My dog ate my TREZOR. Check your recovery seeds folks!
  2. 314 points: my_next_account's comment in Erik Voorhees: “Roger - please stop referencing me to back up your opinion that Bitcoin Cash is Bitcoin. It isn't. Bitcoin is the chain originating from the genesis block with the highest accumulated proof of work. The Bitcoin Cash fork failed to gain majority, thus it is not Bitcoin.”
  3. 259 points: everyother's comment in 1 For whoever questions the utility of Bitcoin, here's banking summarized accurately
  4. 225 points: morli's comment in Can’t believe this was available. My new license plate..
  5. 209 points: groovymash's comment in coincall.io labels BCH a "shitcoin"
  6. 206 points: insanityzwolf's comment in Am I the only one that doesn't mind Bitcoin Cash being called "Bitcoin Cash" instead of just "Bitcoin" (for now)?
  7. 183 points: BitttBurger's comment in MoneyTrigz fails to raise more than $3,700 for Bitcoin.com lawsuit. Considers pulling the plug.
  8. 182 points: patrick99e99's comment in I used to think BCH was the bad guy, now I'm beginning to change the way I see it... Convince me that BCH is the real Bitcoin
  9. 175 points: RollieMe's comment in Trying to see both sides of the scaling debate
  10. 156 points: KillerDr3w's comment in My dog ate my TREZOR. Check your recovery seeds folks!
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] r/Bitcoin recap - January 2018

The following post by SamWouters is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7ui76r
The original post's content was as follows:
Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the thirteenth monthly Bitcoin news recap. I must say it's becoming pretty hard to select just 1 or 2 stories per day, too much is going on!
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in the Bitcoin space over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in January 2018
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Introducing IHB.io and yet another decentralized open source way that block chain technology will change the world.

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE----- Hash: SHA512
tl;dr: check our our new website (ihb.io). privacy overreach is getting out of control and we are attacking this problem by disrupting a multi billion dollar industry.
Dear Bitcoin Community
I hope all is well and this message finds you in good spirits. This is probably not how you should rebrand, but at the end of the day when we started this company one year ago we set out to do something different and we are sticking to our plans.
Phase 1 is over and we are almost ready to move on to Phase 2, but that requires a little input (and hopefully help) from the community. After all, if we don’t have your trust and buy in, we may as well shut down.
For the past 12 months we have attracted 67,000 regular readers who came to our old site ihavebitcoins.com to read our content and look at our market data.
Our analytics also told us:
*Many of us love using Tor. *Many of us love to clear their cache (daily). *Many of us are tech savvy and use high end devices as compared to the average person. *Many of us are from some of the most beautiful Tier 1 cities in the world. *Many of us use Opera and Linux systems more heavily than we have ever seen. 
A lot of people in the community had web behavior that trends towards being security and privacy conscious. Because of this we removed the google analytics cookie and we hope the tradeoff will be worth it.
We know what we did and yes it is so painful seeing our Alexa rank disappear and not get any feedback about site statistics.
We are going to be 100% cookie free. No more annoying popups for our European readers.
*Coindesk 8 *New York Times 25 *Wall Street Journal 57 *NewsBTC 4 *XAPO 6 *Hive Wallet 1 *Coinbase 5 *BTC China 1 *Bitstamp 1 *BTC-e 2 *The Guardian 15 *Drudgereport 29 *Bitcoin Magazine 3 *Coin Telegraph 2 *Crypto Coins News 1 *Bitcoin Foundation 2 *Wikileaks 0 *Business Insider 37 *Huffington Post 25 *BuzzFeed 23 
We like the above news sites and products and are in no way knocking them. There is no alternative so we understand why they are using cookies, but 57 cookies? What are you planning to do, rob a house? Do you really need to know what bank your readers use or when they are looking to purchase a new car?
But in regards to digital marketing, they are essential. Without them, websites would have no avenue of dealing with the largest ad network in the world, Google. Digital ad spending in 2013 was $119.8 billion worldwide. Google’s share of that, according to its 2013 annual financial reporting, was $50.57 billion.
Our Solution
IHB.io has a desire to make money, and we need it to keep doing what we are doing (it is not cheap), so we are working with the Mastercoin protocol to implement an open sourced ad based system that will tie a website’s proprietary server side IP data to web visits and requests pulled.
In a simple non cumbersome manner (still working on the UI for this) we want have you guys (if you choose) give us your public bitcoin address. That address key will then be associated to your specific IP address and if your address changes or if you access the site from another IP you will see a red light in the top right corner, which if you click on, you will be prompted to give us your key again so we can associate the new IP with your public bitcoin address.
We want to create a smart contract on the blockchain with advertisers who will then pay a separate address for the privilege of advertising to a demographic that we believe is affluent, educated, possesses an above average intellect that also happens to be in the coveted 18-34 demographic. Each contract can be unique to the advertiser's needs and the payouts are made if only the required outcomes for it are successful. After the payout is made to the address, the revenue will be split amongst participants. All of this will be public.
In return for your assistance helping to change the paradigm of digital marketing, we want to give our readers a share of the revenue earned. We believe we can convince select advertisers to adapt this system because the Bitcoin demographic is too valuable to ignore. It is no coincidence that all major publications regularly write about Bitcoin for SEO. In the journalism business those articles generate a lot of traffic. At the same time that mainstream media tells us Bitcoin is going nowhere in an article, they are making money from it and in many cases, us directly (judging from the well written comments left on some of these stupid articles).
The whitepaper is almost complete and we will publish it in the coming weeks. We are still figuring out the method for encrypting the IP data so we even we don’t have access to it and making sure it can't be gamed. But basically we want to move towards an opt-in system where users can still maintain 100% privacy.
The new ad network will be:
• Trustless and 100% open source • Secure distributed data sharing that is 100% private • A robust and scalable form of coordination amongst advertisers and websites.
Because of this we have decided to rebrand as IHB.io. It is much easier to recall and type than ihavebitcoins.com, and our plan is to never have a cookie on our site EVER so we can’t count on a lot of the tools that usually bring up your organic traffic.
In our lifetime humans have given up so much privacy that it scares us. We get really worried when we hear the director of the FBI attack Apple and Google’s encryption the way he does. When did we lose our right to private communications? If Paul Revere was tracked on his horse, I can guarantee you the English would have won the revolution. After all he was a terrorist.
We hope this will help Bitcoin as it provides yet another decentralized solution that the block chain can solve and also returns our right to privacy at the same time. It reduces the need for huge server farms and gets rid of the middle man taking a cut. We want to give that cut back to you.
In our opinion, good journalism is being tainted by technology and the need to get views and clicks. Editors must write the catchy headlines and do the stupid Top 10 this and Top 10 that articles to get clicks. That will never go away, but hopefully there will be a clear distinction in the incentives going forward. After all, we basically vote with every click, and we all know the Kardashians are winning on Yahoo.com.
We can’t ask you for an upvote, and we don’t want to collect any of your private data from the very beginning of this experiment, but we do need to get an idea of interest in our Open Source AD Network and we also need a whole bunch of beta testers for this model to be proven.
If you are interested in participating in this beta please leave us a message in anyway possible, Google+, Facebook, follow us on Twitter or comment on this Reddit post. We are very open to feedback from the community and if someone or organization wants to help us with this open source project we would love that as well. You can send us an email to [email protected]
Thank You. IHB
ps. if nothing else, we would appreciate feedback on our new site design. we are most interested in finding out about load times and optimization for your screen. if something is off or did not render properly, please leave a comment with the issue and what device, you were using.
“In the very first month of Indian Opinion, I realized that the sole aim of journalism should be service. The newspaper press is a great power, but just as an unchained torrent of water submerges whole countrysides and devastates crops, even so an uncontrolled pen serves but to destroy. If the control is from without, it proves more poisonous than want of control. It can be profitable only when exercised from within. If this line of reasoning is correct, how many of the journals in the world would stand the test? But who would stop those that are useless? And who should be the judge? The useful and the useless must, like good and evil generally, go on together, and man must make his choice.” Gandhi -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE----- Comment: GPGTools - https://gpgtools.org
iQEcBAEBCgAGBQJUUX+YAAoJEPkg5niIBlAYG/QH/RpxFCNHfluXjDytgpovyaxH 6nJpVSXQGArdqdHJJIoeRcltHKLX0F4P5Z5qpezUZjW4GbyCz4KBi4iQC6WFmO Eq+Woed5+OQwOE2mXocwO7EzT/+h0MJG7rW4uTIEJulozj56tXszEX7NX8G6w5Ym NLr7F9OcIL5UPo5QWoWXJS30NGi0PDU9EngwsTm/prnBOc/QD18WzhjTSyTbEk6K kNimfgdvb4c4NtFLfr1/vaNt+wxxCaQPYqTxrnbZntBMfFMJXUvGe1sjx86NVHmf VgSyuNty3hx6TcqtpLLYxvalTA8B6nHbD/cHshxklhE/SUdruKBD9lPbdZBlDKQ= =N0gX -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
IHB Public Key
submitted by theBitcoin_CEO to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: btc top posts from 2017-01-09 to 2017-02-07 22:40 PDT

Period: 29.80 days
Submissions Comments
Total 999 28052
Rate (per day) 33.52 904.13
Unique Redditors 409 2067
Combined Score 56126 117584

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 3835 points, 41 submissions: Egon_1
    1. "One miner loses $12k from BU bug, some Core devs scream. Users pay millions in excessive tx fees over the last year "meh, not a priority" (529 points, 262 comments)
    2. Charlie Shrem: "Oh cmon. @gavinandresen is the reason we are all here today. Stop attacking people, ...." (256 points, 61 comments)
    3. The core developers don't care about you. Let's fire them by hard fork to Bitcoin unlimited! (231 points, 83 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Core Hashrate Below 80% (211 points, 27 comments)
    5. "Bitcoin is an P2P electronic cash system, not digital gold. If Bitcoin's usefulness as cash is undermined, its value will be undermined too." (198 points, 196 comments)
    6. I like these ads (194 points, 25 comments)
    7. "ViaBTC Transaction Accelerator already help more than 5K delayed transactions got confirmed." (142 points, 27 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Unlimited: Over 800 PH/s (128 points, 21 comments)
    9. ViaBTC produces ZERO empty block in the last month. Best in SPV base mining pool. (117 points, 2 comments)
    10. New ATL (All Time Low) For Bitcoin Core Blocks (114 points, 59 comments)
  2. 2876 points, 24 submissions: ydtm
    1. The debate is not "SHOULD THE BLOCKSIZE BE 1MB VERSUS 1.7MB?". The debate is: "WHO SHOULD DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE?" (1) Should an obsolete temporary anti-spam hack freeze blocks at 1MB? (2) Should a centralized dev team soft-fork the blocksize to 1.7MB? (3) OR SHOULD THE MARKET DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE? (354 points, 116 comments)
    2. BU-SW parity! 231 vs 231 of the last 1000 blocks! Consensus will always win over censorship! MARKET-BASED blocksize will always win over CENTRALLY-PLANNED blocksize! People want blocksize to be determined by the MARKET - not by Greg Maxwell & his 1.7MB anyone-can-spend SegWit-as-a-soft-fork blocks. (271 points, 66 comments)
    3. The number of blocks being mined by Bitcoin Unlimited is now getting very close to surpassing the number of blocks being mined by SegWit! More and more people are supporting BU's MARKET-BASED BLOCKSIZE - because BU avoids needless transaction delays and ultimately increases Bitcoin adoption & price! (185 points, 80 comments)
    4. "Notice how anyone who has even remotely supported on-chain scaling has been censored, hounded, DDoS'd, attacked, slandered & removed from any area of Core influence. Community, business, Hearn, Gavin, Jeff, XT, Classic, Coinbase, Unlimited, ViaBTC, Ver, Jihan, Bitcoin.com, btc" ~ u/randy-lawnmole (176 points, 114 comments)
    5. "Why is Flexible Transactions more future-proof than SegWit?" by u/ThomasZander (175 points, 110 comments)
    6. "You have to understand that Core and their supporters eg Theymos WANT a hardfork to be as messy as possible. This entire time they've been doing their utmost to work AGAINST consensus, and it will continue until they are simply removed from the community like the cancer they are." ~ u/singularity87 (170 points, 28 comments)
    7. Blockstream/Core don't care about you. They're repeatedly crippling the network with their DEV-CONTROLLED blocksize. Congestion & delays are now ROUTINE & PREDICTABLE after increased difficulty / time between blocks. Only we can fix the network - using MARKET-CONTROLLED blocksize (Unlimited/Classic) (168 points, 60 comments)
    8. 3 excellent articles highlighting some of the major problems with SegWit: (1) "Core Segwit – Thinking of upgrading? You need to read this!" by WallStreetTechnologist (2) "SegWit is not great" by Deadalnix (3) "How Software Gets Bloated: From Telephony to Bitcoin" by Emin Gün Sirer (146 points, 59 comments)
    9. This trader's price & volume graph / model predicted that we should be over $10,000 USD/BTC by now. The model broke in late 2014 - when AXA-funded Blockstream was founded, and started spreading propaganda and crippleware, centrally imposing artificially tiny blocksize to suppress the volume & price. (143 points, 97 comments)
    10. Now that BU is overtaking SW, r\bitcoin is in meltdown. The 2nd top post over there (sorted by "worst first" ie "controversial") is full of the most ignorant, confused, brainwashed comments ever seen on r\bitcoin - starting with the erroneous title: "The problem with forking and creating two coins." (142 points, 57 comments)
  3. 2424 points, 31 submissions: realistbtc
    1. Remember this picture ? It was a very strong and cool message from around 2014 . Well, sadly it's not true anymore. But it was universally liked in the Bitcoin space , and probably brought here some of us . I remember even luke-jr reposting it somewhere (oh , the hypocrysis!! ). (249 points, 55 comments)
    2. Emin Gun Sirer on Twitter ' My take is the exact opposite: we are now finding out that Segwit isn't necessary and we can get the same benefits via simpler means. " (248 points, 46 comments)
    3. Gavin Andresen on Twitter : ' The purpose of a consensus system is to arrive at one outcome. Participating means accepting the result even if you initially disagree. ' (204 points, 56 comments)
    4. enough with the blockstream core propaganda : changing the blocksize IS the MORE CAUTIOUS and SAFER approach . if it was done sooner , we would have avoived entirely these unprecedented clycles of network clogging that have caused much frustrations in a lot of actors (173 points, 15 comments)
    5. Gavin Andresen on Twitter - 'This can't be controversial... can it? - a definition of Bitcoin' (136 points, 38 comments)
    6. adam back on twitter "contentious forks are bad idea for confidence & concept of digital scarcity. wait for the ETFs. profit. mean time deploy segwit & lightning" - no! a corrupt company like blockstream with a washed out ex cypherpunk like adam are what's bad for Bitcoin . (122 points, 115 comments)
    7. "Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System" - if you stray from that , you don't get to keep calling it Bitcoin. call it blockstreamcoin, adamcoin, gregcoin, theymoscoin or whatever and go fork off yourself . (112 points, 19 comments)
    8. soon 21 will have to change the scale , because 180 satoshi/KB won't be enough anymore - madness - feel free to send your complaints to greg maxwell CTO of blockstream (112 points, 31 comments)
    9. PSA : if you use a ledger wallet , you risk paying an absurdly high free - see here : 10$ for a 225 bytes 150$ tx - but remember , it's all fine for your elitist and gregonomic friends at blockstream (109 points, 111 comments)
    10. Luke 'the liar' Dashjr : ' My BIP draft didn't make progress because the community opposes any block size increase hardfork ever. ' -- yes , he wrote exactly that !! (96 points, 33 comments)
  4. 2129 points, 43 submissions: increaseblocks
    1. After failing to get 10K bitcoins for stolen NSA exploits, Shadow Brokers post farewell message, dump a cache of Windows hacking tools online (181 points, 23 comments)
    2. Coinbase and the IRS (146 points, 69 comments)
    3. Ryan X. Charles on Twitter - There is a leadership gap in bitcoin left by technical community members who didn't listen to miners, businesses or users. (117 points, 44 comments)
    4. Blockstream Core developer says you should "pay a $5 fee" to get your transaction to go through! (116 points, 32 comments)
    5. $2.50 transaction FEE paid on $37 transaction, still unconfirmed for 24 hours!! (109 points, 37 comments)
    6. Blockstream shareholder gives a little more insight into the company (107 points, 33 comments)
    7. Finished setting up my Unlimited full node. Took just over 24 hrs to sync with a 5 yr old laptop and standard U.S. connection + $50 1TB hard drive! (96 points, 46 comments)
    8. Matt Corallo/TheBlueMatt leaves Blockstream to go work for Chaincode Labs... is the Blockstream house of cards beginning to crumble? (86 points, 175 comments)
    9. 53,000 transactions in the backlog! (75 points, 79 comments)
    10. Doctor ₿ Goss on Twitter: Spending a year on #segwit instead of coordinating blocksize increase may not have been wise. Money that doesn't work is worthless (70 points, 11 comments)
  5. 1590 points, 9 submissions: parban333
    1. Dear Theymos, you divided the Bitcoin community. Not Roger, not Gavin, not Mike. It was you. And dear Blockstream and Core team, you helped, not calling out the abhorrent censorship, the unforgivable manipulation, unbecoming of supposed cypherpunks. Or of any decent, civil persons. (566 points, 87 comments)
    2. nullc disputes that Satoshi Nakamoto left Gavin in control of Bitcoin, asks for citation, then disappears after such citation is clearly provided. greg maxwell is blatantly a toxic troll and an enemy of Satoshi's Bitcoin. (400 points, 207 comments)
    3. Remember: while the blockstream trolls take Peter R out of context, Peter Todd really think Bitcoin should have a 1%/security tax via inflation. (146 points, 92 comments)
    4. So, Alice is causing a problem. Alice is then trying to sell you a solution for that problem. Alice now tell that if you are not buying into her solution, you are the cause of the problem. Replace Alice with Greg & Adam.. (139 points, 28 comments)
    5. SegWit+limited on-chain scaling: brought to you by the people that couldn't believe Bitcoin was actually a sound concept. (92 points, 47 comments)
    6. Remember: the manipulative Adam Back, CEO of Blockstream, want to fool every newcomer that doesn't know better into thinking that he practically invented Bitcoin. (91 points, 22 comments)
    7. Not only segwit support is laughable at the moment for something targeting 95% adoption, but it's actually diminishing. Wallet devs and people that spent resources implementing that ridiculous contraption must feel a bit silly at the moment.... (83 points, 143 comments)
    8. It's ironic that blockstream's concerns about hard forks security are what's actually caused concerns about hard forks security. (46 points, 5 comments)
    9. The Intercept - "Hidden loopholes allow FBI agents to infiltrate political and religious groups" - Just something to consider, right? (27 points, 2 comments)
  6. 1471 points, 10 submissions: sandakersmann
    1. Charlie Shrem on Twitter: "If we don't implement bigger blocks ASAP, Paypal will be cheaper than #bitcoin. I already pay a few dollars per tx. Stop hindering growth." (472 points, 254 comments)
    2. Olivier Janssens on Twitter: "Do you like Bitcoin? Then you like an unlimited block size. The limit was put in place as a temp fix and was never hit before last year." (252 points, 189 comments)
    3. Ryan X. Charles on Twitter: "Bigger blocks will allow more people access to every aspect of bitcoin, enhancing decentralization" (213 points, 179 comments)
    4. Is Bitcoin Unlimited Headed for Activation? (149 points, 38 comments)
    5. Marius Kjærstad on Twitter: "High fees push real economy out of #Bitcoin and makes price driven by speculation. Result is a lower real economy floor to catch the knife." (132 points, 37 comments)
    6. No Primary Litecoin Pool Will Upgrade to Segwit, Says LTC1BTC's Founder (103 points, 60 comments)
    7. Charlie Shrem: "Bitcoin is been built to appreciate or die. That's how it is. It has to continue to grow. If it doesn't grow then it's just gonna go away." (76 points, 15 comments)
    8. G. Andrew Stone & Andrew Clifford: Bitcoin Unlimited (Episode 166) (36 points, 1 comment)
    9. Joseph VaughnPerling on Twitter: "#SegWit on $LTC's safe b/c low TX vol. AnyoneCanSpend TX UTXO unlikely to hit 51% attack cost. On $BTC it'd be insidiously fatal. @SegWit" (21 points, 8 comments)
    10. Bitcoin Plummets After China Launches "Market Manipulation" Investigations Of Bitcoin Exchanges (17 points, 0 comments)
  7. 1408 points, 7 submissions: BeijingBitcoins
    1. LOL - /bitcoin user claims that people aren't being actively silenced; is actively silenced. (307 points, 142 comments)
    2. Reality check: today's minor bug caused the bitcoin.com pool to miss out on a $12000 block reward, and was fixed within hours. Core's 1MB blocksize limit has cost the users of bitcoin >$100k per day for the past several months. (270 points, 173 comments)
    3. Satoshi: "The eventual solution will be to not care how big [block size] gets." (250 points, 75 comments)
    4. Top post on /bitcoin about high transaction fees. 709 comments. Every time you click "load more comments," there is nothing there. How many posts are being censored? The manipulation of free discussion by /bitcoin moderators needs to end yesterday. (229 points, 91 comments)
    5. Bitcoin Unlimited blocks at all time high! (143 of last 1000) (191 points, 56 comments)
    6. Censored in bitcoin: "Bitcoin Core hashrate reaches 79.7%" (91 points, 61 comments)
    7. Bitcoin Transaction Fees - All Time (70 points, 18 comments)
  8. 1235 points, 40 submissions: chinawat
    1. Julian Assange just used the bitcoin block number 447506 as a proof of life. (199 points, 42 comments)
    2. "$3000 donated anonymously to the @internetarchive in bitcoin just now. Made our day!" -- Brewster Kahle on Twitter (97 points, 3 comments)
    3. ‘Barclays took my £440,000 and put me through hell’ | Money (76 points, 22 comments)
    4. Venezuelan Police Arrest Eight Bitcoin Miners in Two Weeks, and the Country's Leading Bitcoin Exchange Suspends Operations (52 points, 2 comments)
    5. The Path To $10,000 Bitcoin (46 points, 11 comments)
    6. How Deutsche Bank Made a $462 Million Loss Disappear (44 points, 6 comments)
    7. "The plan (#mBTC units) has been discussed amongst local #Chinese exchanges, & we believe it will appease the regulators, w/ "lower" prices." -- Bobby Lee on Twitter (43 points, 36 comments)
    8. "Everyone knows that we need to reduce the max block size, but is a one-time drop to 300 kB really the best way?" -- theymos (40 points, 68 comments)
    9. Buy bitcoin from any 7-11 in the Philippines (36 points, 0 comments)
    10. The Race Is On for a Bitcoin ETF (31 points, 14 comments)
  9. 1010 points, 17 submissions: 1and1make5
    1. Last 1000 Blocks - Bitcoin Unlimited overtakes soft-fork-segwit signaling (165 points, 25 comments)
    2. Again: Bigger Blocks Mean More Decentralization - Roger Ver (101 points, 59 comments)
    3. cnLedger on Twitter - "@todu77 Contacted http://BTC.TOP . A different logic was used when dealing w/ (very occasional) empty blc. They'll update to BU only" (94 points, 6 comments)
    4. Controlling your own wealth as a basic human right - Brian Armstrong (93 points, 30 comments)
    5. Last 1000 Blocks - 20% of the Bitcoin mining network supports Bitcoin Unlimited (89 points, 4 comments)
    6. BTC.top current hashrate: ~100 Ph/s (71 points, 5 comments)
    7. Throwback Thursday: BTC.top mined their first BU block 1 month ago with ~31 Ph/s, today they have ~149 Ph/s (68 points, 6 comments)
    8. Epicenter Bitcoin 166 - G. Andrew Stone & Andrew Clifford: Bitcoin Unlimited (63 points, 50 comments)
    9. Coinbase Obtains the Bitlicense (53 points, 19 comments)
    10. Fun fact (doesn't mean anything): In the last 24 hours more blocks have signaled support for Bitcoin Unlimited than soft-fork-segwit (53 points, 5 comments)
  10. 984 points, 20 submissions: seweso
    1. Bitcoin unlimited is an expression of freedom. And freedom will always be misconstrued by paternalists/statists as something dangerous. (120 points, 64 comments)
    2. My hope for Bitcoin Unlimited is not to force a hardfork upon everyone, but to break through the censorship, to open minds. (106 points, 88 comments)
    3. Core threatening a POW change makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. (97 points, 58 comments)
    4. "We will run a SegWit release in production by the time [a 2MB hardfork] is released in a version of Bitcoin Core." (94 points, 84 comments)
    5. Blocked by Peter Todd for pointing out he started the propaganda war with his slippery slope video. (92 points, 41 comments)
    6. I can't wait to spend everyone's SegWit funds on a hard-forked >1Mb chain. ~ Seweso (72 points, 72 comments)
    7. BashCo putting his Bitcoin ignorance on display by stating "60,000 #Bitcoin transactions don't just magically appear out of thin air. #spam" (66 points, 12 comments)
    8. Bitcoin Core developers discussing and deciding on Bitcoin economics again (47 points, 13 comments)
    9. Reaction to: why-bitcoin-unlimiteds-emergent-consensus-gamble (46 points, 9 comments)
    10. "@seweso Show me an instance where core pushed out a change and cost miners a block reward." ~ I can do that ;) (37 points, 6 comments)
  11. 883 points, 16 submissions: Shock_The_Stream
    1. Emin Gün Sirer: Finally getting to the crux of the battle. LN/Segwit/fee-market are a synonym for "high fees." Nothing about this tech requires high fees. (155 points, 78 comments)
    2. BTC.TOP !! - New Alltime High for BU blocks @199 ! BTC.TOP alone just mined 4 BU blocks within 47 minutes (115 points, 26 comments)
    3. The great halvening of Samson's Segwit Pool: Mission accomplished! 1 yr: 12.50%, 6 month: 11.10%, 1 month: 7.83%, 1week: 6.67%, 4 days: 6% (107 points, 56 comments)
    4. Surpise: SegWit SF becomes more and more centralized - around half of all Segwit signals come from Bitfury ... (107 points, 45 comments)
    5. BS of the week by Rusty Russell: "If segwit doesn't activate, something is badly broken in Bitcoin" (102 points, 97 comments)
    6. Slush pool: Incredible bad luck for the Bitcoin Unlimited voters (43 points, 26 comments)
    7. The Bitfury Attack (43 points, 38 comments)
    8. 799! Jiang Zhuo'er teared down this wall! (40 points, 13 comments)
    9. Did Slush just stop mining segwit with the 'don't care' voters? (39 points, 36 comments)
    10. Fortune favours the bold: BTC.TOP with 300% luck today (30 points, 2 comments)
  12. 754 points, 10 submissions: AQuentson
    1. Price Shoots Up as Miners Checkmate and Bitcoin Unlimited Surpasses Segwit. (113 points, 28 comments)
    2. One Transaction Will Cost $400 if Bitcoin Hits $10,000 According to Jameson Lopp (104 points, 39 comments)
    3. Bitcoin Core Developer: Satoshi's Design Doesn't Work (100 points, 78 comments)
    4. Wow! Had no idea the BitcoinMarkets subreddit is completely censored. (90 points, 29 comments)
    5. F2Pool Will Not Upgrade Its Bitcoin Pool to Segwit "Anytime Soon" (89 points, 21 comments)
    6. The Bitcoin Market Needs Big Blocks, Says Founder of BTC.TOP Mining Pool (82 points, 21 comments)
    7. Almost $1 Billion Worth of Bitcoins Stuck in Transaction Backlog (72 points, 8 comments)
    8. ViaBTC's Hashrate Increases to 12 Percent (58 points, 2 comments)
    9. “The protocol debate is not my priority." - Jihan Wu, Bitmain's Founder (24 points, 13 comments)
    10. Wow! Almost $1 Billion Worth of Bitcoin is Stuck, Can't Move - What Happens if no Block is Found in One Hour (as has happened before) Will Bitcoin Literally Break Down? (22 points, 14 comments)
  13. 744 points, 10 submissions: BobsBurgers3Bitcoin
    1. Bitcoin Unlimited 1.0.0 has been released (274 points, 130 comments)
    2. Censored in r\Bitcoin: "35.8 Cents: Average Transaction Fee so far in 2017. The Average Transaction Fee in 2016 was 16.5 Cents" (260 points, 123 comments)
    3. 35.8 Cents: Average Transaction Fee so far in 2017. The Average Transaction Fee in 2016 was 16.5 Cents (74 points, 18 comments)
    4. Former Fed Employee Fined $5,000 for Using Computer for Bitcoin (37 points, 5 comments)
    5. Bitcoin: Why It Now Belongs in Every Portfolio (26 points, 0 comments)
    6. Bitcoin is 'a great hedge against the system' and could be the new gold (18 points, 1 comment)
    7. Bitcoin Will Change Money Like the Internet Changed Video (15 points, 0 comments)
    8. Is Warren Buffett Wrong About Bitcoin? (14 points, 3 comments)
    9. Bitseed Review – A Plug & Play Full Bitcoin Node (13 points, 2 comments)
    10. Bitcoin is soaring (and Business Insider does not change the title of the almost identical article published 3 weeks ago by the same author) (13 points, 1 comment)
  14. 732 points, 10 submissions: specialenmity
    1. Fantasy land: Thinking that a hard fork will be disastrous to the price, yet thinking that a future average fee of > $1 and average wait times of > 1 day won't be disastrous to the price. (209 points, 70 comments)
    2. "Segwit is a permanent solution to refuse any blocksize increase in the future and move the txs and fees to the LN hubs. The chinese miners are not as stupid as the blockstream core devaluators want them to be." shock_the_stream (150 points, 83 comments)
    3. In response to the "unbiased" ELI5 of Core vs BU and this gem: "Core values trustlessness and decentralization above all. Bitcoin Unlimited values low fees for on-chain transactions above all else." (130 points, 45 comments)
    4. Core's own reasoning doesn't add up: If segwit requires 95% of last 2016 blocks to activate, and their fear of using a hardfork instead of a softfork is "splitting the network", then how does a hardfork with a 95% trigger even come close to potentially splitting the network? (96 points, 130 comments)
    5. luke-jr defines "using bitcoin" as running a full node. Dictates that the cost of moving money ( a transaction) should exceed "using bitcoin". Hah (38 points, 17 comments)
    6. If it's not activating that is a strong evidence that the claims of it being dire were and continue to be without substance. nullc (36 points, 23 comments)
    7. I'm more concerned that bitcoin can't change than whether or not we scale in the near future by SF or HF (26 points, 9 comments)
    8. "The best available research right now suggested an upper bound of 4MB. This figure was considering only a subset of concerns, in particular it ignored economic impacts, long term sustainability, and impacts on synchronization time.." nullc (20 points, 4 comments)
    9. At any point in time mining pools could have increased the block reward through forking and yet they haven't. Why? Because it is obvious that the community wouldn't like that and correspondingly the price would plummet (14 points, 14 comments)
    10. The flawed mind of jstolfi (13 points, 17 comments)
  15. 708 points, 7 submissions: knight222
    1. BTC.TOP operator: “We have prepared $100 million USD to kill the small fork of CoreCoin, no matter what POW algorithm, sha256 or scrypt or X11 or any other GPU algorithm. Show me your money. We very much welcome a CoreCoin change to POS.” (241 points, 252 comments)
    2. For those who missed it, this is how the hardfork with Bitcoin Unlimited will happen. (173 points, 79 comments)
    3. Blocks mined with Bitcoin Unlimited reaching 18% (133 points, 28 comments)
    4. Bitcoin Unlimited is less than 1% away from outpacing Segwit for the last 1000 blocks mined (90 points, 44 comments)
    5. BU nodes peaked in the last days (28 points, 6 comments)
    6. Blockstream never tried to compromise but they will (too late). This is why: (22 points, 4 comments)
    7. BTC.TOP is having a good day (21 points, 6 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. Adrian-X (3622 points, 821 comments)
  2. H0dl (3157 points, 563 comments)
  3. Bitcoinopoly (2732 points, 345 comments)
  4. knight222 (2319 points, 361 comments)
  5. MeTheImaginaryWizard (2043 points, 429 comments)
  6. Ant-n (1818 points, 387 comments)
  7. todu (1756 points, 265 comments)
  8. seweso (1742 points, 328 comments)
  9. awemany (1690 points, 401 comments)
  10. Shock_The_Stream (1647 points, 217 comments)
  11. Helvetian616 (1578 points, 206 comments)
  12. Egon_1 (1478 points, 162 comments)
  13. realistbtc (1299 points, 95 comments)
  14. BitcoinIsTehFuture (1231 points, 139 comments)
  15. LovelyDay (1226 points, 196 comments)
  16. thcymos (1172 points, 117 comments)
  17. BeijingBitcoins (1098 points, 58 comments)
  18. Yheymos (1061 points, 69 comments)
  19. steb2k (1058 points, 238 comments)
  20. ydtm (987 points, 132 comments)
  21. dontcensormebro2 (975 points, 106 comments)
  22. chinawat (972 points, 223 comments)
  23. increaseblocks (934 points, 73 comments)
  24. segregatedwitness (921 points, 101 comments)
  25. Annapurna317 (874 points, 146 comments)
  26. DaSpawn (817 points, 162 comments)
  27. insette (808 points, 91 comments)
  28. TanksAblazment (803 points, 150 comments)
  29. blockstreamcoin (787 points, 133 comments)
  30. MeatsackMescalero (774 points, 95 comments)
  31. satoshis_sockpuppet (745 points, 126 comments)
  32. BitcoinXio (739 points, 50 comments)
  33. jstolfi (734 points, 183 comments)
  34. singularity87 (720 points, 90 comments)
  35. Richy_T (704 points, 163 comments)
  36. redlightsaber (690 points, 138 comments)
  37. Leithm (686 points, 74 comments)
  38. ErdoganTalk (668 points, 252 comments)
  39. BitcoinPrepper (665 points, 89 comments)
  40. reddaxx (664 points, 105 comments)
  41. r1q2 (660 points, 110 comments)
  42. papabitcoin (653 points, 79 comments)
  43. 2ndEntropy (632 points, 76 comments)
  44. FormerlyEarlyAdopter (608 points, 92 comments)
  45. Coolsource (595 points, 116 comments)
  46. Peter__R (589 points, 43 comments)
  47. timepad (570 points, 62 comments)
  48. Rawlsdeep (564 points, 109 comments)
  49. themgp (560 points, 46 comments)
  50. ForkiusMaximus (558 points, 89 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Dear Theymos, you divided the Bitcoin community. Not Roger, not Gavin, not Mike. It was you. And dear Blockstream and Core team, you helped, not calling out the abhorrent censorship, the unforgivable manipulation, unbecoming of supposed cypherpunks. Or of any decent, civil persons. by parban333 (566 points, 87 comments)
  2. "One miner loses $12k from BU bug, some Core devs scream. Users pay millions in excessive tx fees over the last year "meh, not a priority" by Egon_1 (529 points, 262 comments)
  3. Charlie Shrem on Twitter: "If we don't implement bigger blocks ASAP, Paypal will be cheaper than #bitcoin. I already pay a few dollars per tx. Stop hindering growth." by sandakersmann (472 points, 254 comments)
  4. nullc disputes that Satoshi Nakamoto left Gavin in control of Bitcoin, asks for citation, then disappears after such citation is clearly provided. greg maxwell is blatantly a toxic troll and an enemy of Satoshi's Bitcoin. by parban333 (400 points, 207 comments)
  5. The debate is not "SHOULD THE BLOCKSIZE BE 1MB VERSUS 1.7MB?". The debate is: "WHO SHOULD DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE?" (1) Should an obsolete temporary anti-spam hack freeze blocks at 1MB? (2) Should a centralized dev team soft-fork the blocksize to 1.7MB? (3) OR SHOULD THE MARKET DECIDE THE BLOCKSIZE? by ydtm (354 points, 116 comments)
  6. LOL - /bitcoin user claims that people aren't being actively silenced; is actively silenced. by BeijingBitcoins (307 points, 142 comments)
  7. Massive censorship on "/bitcoin" continues by BitcoinIsTehFuture (296 points, 123 comments)
  8. Charlie Shrem on Twitter: "You can talk about anything in BTC and it won't be auto deleted" by BitcoinXio (291 points, 69 comments)
  9. Bitcoin Unlimited blocks exceed Core for first time, 232 vs. 231 of last 1,000 by DNVirtual (282 points, 84 comments)
  10. As relevant as it's always been by iopq (276 points, 15 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 151 points: nicebtc's comment in "One miner loses $12k from BU bug, some Core devs scream. Users pay millions in excessive tx fees over the last year "meh, not a priority"
  2. 123 points: 1DrK44np3gMKuvcGeFVv's comment in "One miner loses $12k from BU bug, some Core devs scream. Users pay millions in excessive tx fees over the last year "meh, not a priority"
  3. 117 points: cryptovessel's comment in nullc disputes that Satoshi Nakamoto left Gavin in control of Bitcoin, asks for citation, then disappears after such citation is clearly provided. greg maxwell is blatantly a toxic troll and an enemy of Satoshi's Bitcoin.
  4. 117 points: seweso's comment in Roger Ver banned for doxing after posting the same thread Prohashing was banned for.
  5. 113 points: BitcoinIsTehFuture's comment in Dear Theymos, you divided the Bitcoin community. Not Roger, not Gavin, not Mike. It was you. And dear Blockstream and Core team, you helped, not calling out the abhorrent censorship, the unforgivable manipulation, unbecoming of supposed cypherpunks. Or of any decent, civil persons.
  6. 106 points: MagmaHindenburg's comment in bitcoin.com loses 13.2BTC trying to fork the network: Untested and buggy BU creates an oversized block, Many BU node banned, the HF fails • /Bitcoin
  7. 98 points: lon102guy's comment in bitcoin.com loses 13.2BTC trying to fork the network: Untested and buggy BU creates an oversized block, Many BU node banned, the HF fails • /Bitcoin
  8. 97 points: bigboi2468's comment in contentious forks vs incremental progress
  9. 92 points: vbuterin's comment in [Mark Friedenbach] There is a reason we are generally up in arms about "abusive" data-on-blockchain proposals: it is because we see the potential of this tech!
  10. 89 points: Peter__R's comment in contentious forks vs incremental progress
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[Table] IAmA: I was a professional password cracker who taught government agents who's now working on a secure distributed communications & computation platform with bitcoin instead of upvotes. AMA!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2014-05-03
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
a more serious question, what is password cracking like? Bruteforcing hashes, looking through source code for vulnerabilities, doing advanced maths or something fourth? First I'd try to figure out if the software was merely using access denial or encryption. With access denial, the data isn't encrypted, but the software won't show you the data without the password. For purposes of criminal forensics, you're not allowed to change the data in any way for it to be admissible in court, but getting access to the file before you have a password can often be helpful. To figure that out, I'd just look at the file in a hex editor; if I could read it, it wasn't encrypted. The next easy step is to scan the program for cryptographic constants; these are things like s-boxes or tables of rotation constants or such that tell me what crypto functions, if any, are being used. For example, if I see 637c777b anywhere, I know it's probably using AES. If I see 77073096, that's a CRC32. If I see 67452301, it's using MD5. After that I'd use a debugger and a program like IDA Pro to start at the point where you type the password and figure out what the program does with it. This is what often took the most time and was the most tedious. Early versions of MS Access, for instance, just XORed the password with a fixed constant; anyone could break those passwords immediately. The toughest one that I was able to break was the encryption on WinZip; it was much better than most stuff I ran into, but still weak enough that I could break it. That was the one I enjoyed the most, like an extra-challenging Sudoku or something.
The hash function wasn't cryptographically strong, so I was able to run a lot of it backwards and get a enough constraints on the input to skip most possibilities. What is this process called if I wanted to learn about it in an academic setting? Cryptanalysis.
WinZip; it was much better than most stuff I ran into Is it any better than 7Zip? My attack was on the old encryption method. WinZip has since upgraded to AES, like 7-Zip. The only way to attack an archive made by a recent version of either of these is with a dictionary attack, trying every password.
What was the biggest password you ever cracked? Nowadays, most software companies use strong crypto, so the difficulty of cracking the password increases exponentially with the length. Back in the late 90s, it was mostly "roll your own", so the strength depended a lot more on the software than the password chosen.
That said, the password I was most pleased with was a 60-character randomly chosen password on a WinZip file using the ciphertext-only attack that later got published.
Was the content worth the effort? What was the content? The content was irrelevant to me; the fact that I had broken the encryption so thoroughly on such an important file format was the exciting bit. When it was in beta, the FBI started sending us files with suspected child porn for us to open. Thankfully I never had to look at any of it---that was someone else's job---but it felt good to know that I was able to help with that. Once we integrated it into the toolkit, of course, the FBI would just use our software themselves.
Now, though, I think that it's more important that people be taught what is right and have freedom---even if such drimes still exist---than to have a society in which every activity is so policed that crime is impossible. I think we should make it hard for the government to do such enormous, sweeping surveillance as we've discovered they've been doing.
If there's sufficient evidence to suspect someone of a crime, the government has plenty of resources to target that individual, and no software will prevent them getting the information they want. Splicious, if it is funded, will help in preventing surveilllance at national scales.
It's funny how no one seems to be responding to the thing you're actually talking about... it seems to me you're raising awareness about splicious. Can you say more about that? EDIT: I need to make clear that it doesn't fully exist yet! We need money to continue to make it real.
As I wrote above, it's a platform for encouraging the creation and curation of content. The idea is to reward both those who create content and those who share it. You may have seen that picture of handing out Facebook likes to 3rd world kids; merely "liking" something or upvoting it doesn't actually help somebody make a living. So all likes/upvotes have real money behind them in this system. The originator of content gets 90% of each upvote, while the remaining 10% is distributed down the chain of resharers to the donator.
We want artists and musicians to use it, but also scientists, authors, and journalists. We think the journalists will be particularly interested both because of the potential to get supported directly in the wake of digital media, but also because of the security features we intend to implement, like perfect forward secrecy.
We hope scientists will like it, because big academic publishers like Elsevier charge tens of millions of dollars for bundled access to their journals and have something like a 36% profit margin. The scientists write and review the articles and edit the journals for free; Elsevier turns around and charges them for the privilege. Splicious would allow people to set up electronic journals quickly, while contributions go directly to the authors and the editors.
Could you inbox me my password if you wanted or felt the need? That would require getting Reddit's collection of password hashes. It would take some effort, but probably a lot more than would be worth my while.
Well, it used to be easier. Wow! Yeah, hopefully they learned something after that. :P.
Could you be a very rich man if you used your powers for evil? I could have in the 90s. I think the FBI are a lot better at dealing with crime on the internet now than they were then.
Hi, I'm a math/CS undergraduate and find this stuff fascinating. However, I haven't a clue how to get started. Any reccomendations on how to get into password cracking and hacking? As to your specific topics, the days of easy password cracking are largely over: any software worth spending money on will use strong crypto. The best one can usually do is a dictionary attack distributed over many computers.
Awesome! What is your ed background? When I got the job I was getting my undergrad degree in physics. I went on to get a MSc and have just finished my PhD.
How much were you taught on the job vs what you had learned through self study? All of the math I learned in school or from Schneier's Applied Cryptography. I taught myself the rudiments of programming as a kid and all my electives at university were computer science classes. I learned to read assembly code on the job.
What would you say is the most lucrative area of infosec (both for black and white hats)? If you want to make enormous amounts of money, you start a company and get bought out or have a successful IPO. That's very risky, though; if you want stable good money in infosec, go join Google's security team: I did and loved it!
Are you employed now by Google? No, I left last year to start working on splicious. I'd like to keep doing so, but we need funding!
Whats this splicious you keep referring to? It's a distributed secure communications and computation platform. It has features to encourage the creation and curation of new content, but is intended to be a general purpose secure distributed computation platform.
The computation framework is based on pi calculus; I've written a paper with Greg Meredith and Sophia Drossopolou showing that we can use Caires' sspatial/behavioral types as a security policy language and let the compiler check that the implementation fits the policy. (TL; DR: We can prove that we don't have security flaws of various kinds.)
Are you Hackers or War Games fan? I loved it when you nuked Las Vegas. Suitably biblical ending to the place, don't you think?
Have you ever hacked people? Not without their permission.
That sounds a bit weird. Hahahaha. It's not much weirder than tattooing: Link to io9.com
Of course they still had to get the hashes somewhere, but there are some pretty powerful tools in the public domain these days, who knows what is behind the curtains in the federal side of the house...(proposed quantum computing password cracking for instance) People simply don't have the ability to remember passwords that are strong enough to resist the password crackers. If your service has the option to use two-factor authentication, use it; when attackers steal gmail accounts, the first thing they do is turn it on, because it makes it virtually impossible for the owner to get it back. If your service doesn't have 2-factor auth, use a long passphrase. Here's some math: if you just use lowercase letters and have a 16-character password, there are around 1022 passwords to try. If you start using numbers, too, there are around 1024, so a hundred times harder. But if instead you double the length of the password, there are around 1044, which is a sextillion times harder. Quantum computation is certainly interesting to the NSA, but the technology isn't up to code cracking yet; scientists are just at the edge of beating the error bound necessary for quantum computations with more than a handful of qubits. Link to www.news.ucsb.edu
How could a regular person like me learn the basics of this? What did you mean by "this"? Reverse engineering, password cracking, or secure distributed communications?
All of it and where should one start? I've done custom rainbow salt sables and attempted wpa2 attacks for fun and cracking hashes using Cain and Able. For reverse engineering, woodmann.com is the place to be. Get a copy of OllyDBG and IDA Pro; there is an older version available for free. Here's a reasonable intro to some of the techniques: Link to yurichev.com
Actual question how good is router security with passwords for example can you or have you hacked a router (guessing default passwords don't count)? I haven't ever tried breaking router passwords; I have my own router, so I don't need to use anyone else's.
Are you the guy that made this video: Link to www.youtube.com ? Yep. In addition to the content creation and curation stuff, there's also a notion of controlling who gets access to personal information. In the video, I drew how Alice can prevent Bob from knowing her name or address while still proving that she's 21.
But we need money to make it real.
Are you in fundraising mode? Are you doing crowd funding? Do you have a site? Yes, we're doing crowd funding. The site is linked in the description.
How is there such a huge disconnect between you and I? I send hours on the computer and can't do shit with it other than reddit and excel spreadsheets. How do you get into it? Is it a lot of reading? How does it work? I think you become good at doing what you spend time on, and you tend to spend time on things that you like doing. I learned this stuff because it made me happy. I get a thrill out of this sort of thing, so I keep coming back.
That said, with enough hard work, you can become good enough at something that it's no longer a drag: playing piano for the first few years sucks. Who wants to sit there plunking out "Mary had a little lamb"? But once you have the skill to actually read music and play it, then you're free to explore all your musical tastes. After you've played a lot of the music you love, you get a feeling for chord changes and what sounds good to you, so you can improvise your own music.
It's the same way with math and programming: there's some hard stuff at the start, but once you become good enough at it, you can start behaving like an artist and do your own thing.
The equivalent of learning "Mary had a little lamb" is introductory programming sites like KhanAcademy or codeacademy or code.org or a bazillion others.
What do you think of the new NSA, using the Patriot Act? I think the Patriot Act traded an enormous amount of liberty for what turned out to be virtually no increase in security.
Is that the same platform that this ex-Googler was talking about in this video Link to www.youtube.com. Yes, that's Vlad Patryshev. He was one of the guys who made Orkut. He was actually really excited about splicious and said, "I've been waiting for this since FidoNet."
Thanks. I'll look into all that. Lol, well that's a different story, a lucky one too. So you had no knowledge or experience with programming and they just hired you? What degree were you going to go after if you went to collee? Oh yeah, did you end up going to college after all or you just stuck with the job and learned from them? I had plenty of programming experience, but no crypto experience. I couldn't decide for a while between computer science and physics. Eventually I compromised and got a degree in applied physics; basically, all my electives were CS. I finished my bachelor's degree, then lost the job when the dot com bubble burst, went to New Zealand and got a MSc in CS, then started a PhD but ran out of money, went to work for Google's security team and started working on the PhD part time. I worked there for six years, then quit to work on splicious. I just finished the thesis and will defend later this year.
I might be late to the party, but what do you think of the XKCD password comic? This is the method I'm currently using with the help of Make Me A Passwords generator. It's spot on. When given the option, use long phrases rather than gibberish. LastPass can manage your online passwords by generating very long gibberish but only require you to use something memorable.
You actually suggest LastPass over KeePass(X)? I was using LastPass as an example of the genre, like how the southern US refers to any carbonated soft drink as "coke". I haven't made an extensive study of the offerings.
Are you Jesus? 'cause you look a lot like him. I was babysitting with another guy for a group of moms once, and when one of the moms dropped off her young kid---maybe four or five years old---he got really big-eyed and nervous. I thought he was afraid of the beard and hair: sometimes people would cross to the other side of the street when they saw me coming. So I invited him in, showed him the toys, and we all played and had a good time.
When his mom came to pick him up, he ran over and said, "Jesus is fun!"
Hey Mike, my understanding is that you've built a distributed platform and also adding on bitcoin support so that every post you make on splicious could potentially generate revenue. i would say that it's a new take on an alternate virtual economy and want to try as soon as they allow public use. are you planning to add some kind of reputation system to it? say, if i want to look for something a'la craig's list style rather than post my poetry? We've been thinking about reputation systems, but don't have any firm plans. Part of the problem with reputation systems online is that people do "pump & dump", using their reputation to steal something. If anyone has ideas or references about fighting this, please PM me.
Was most of your work just using parallelism brute forcing, or did you look for vulnerabilities in encryption standards. Also what is your opinion on the vulnerabilities of dual eliptic curve cryptography? Nearly all of my work was cryptanalysis of the relatively weak cryptography that was prevalent in the late '90s. We started turning to parallelism when MS Word improved its crypto to the 40-bit stuff that was the limit for software you could export.
The vulnerability in the PRNG for dual ECC was clearly inserted by the NSA and weakened everyone's crypto, even the US military and government's. I'm surprised that there's not more outcry from the other government organizations.
Last pass gotta remember that one. The o e thing I'm worried about though is my email is under yahoo and I've heard they are famous with being hacked because of crappy protection programs or leaks even is this true? Looks like Yahoo has 2-factor auth available. If you turn it on, then even if crackers do figure out your password, they won't be able to log in with it because they don't have your phone. That's the single best thing you can do.
Can you explain this like you would to someone who's never heard of hacking? There's no password you can remember that would stand up to modern cracking software. If you use a long passphrase, you might stand a chance. 2-factor auth is the only way to stay safe.
Can you tell me how to turn it on in a pm please. I'll just put it here, since everyone ought to know this: Link to www.zonealarm.com
What's your computelaptop specs? I had a Macbook Pro, like most of Google security team, and got myself another when I left. It has all the benefits of unix with really nice hardware and good suport.
What makes one password cracker different than another? Edit: Wonderful beard. Generally it's how well they take advantage of the parallelism in the GPU. And thanks!
Do you feel That bitcoin as a currency will make it even with all of the theft and ease at which people are being hacked and having coins stolen. I have no particular attachment to bitcoin as a currency. Ben Laurie, for example, has some excellent points about how to keep bitcoin secure, you either have to trust the software authors or spend half of all computing power for the rest of eternity. If you're going to trust people, there are much more efficient ways to mint money. Link to www.links.org
For our purposes, bitcoin provides a fairly simple micropayments service; any other distributed currency would probably work just as well.
We also don't store the wallets ourselves; we use blockchain.info.
I feel the success will be based on micro payments. IE reading a Wall Street journal article for a .05 or .10 fee and not having to buy the whole newspaper or article. Just my 2 cents.. Exactly. A journalist would write an article and share it with WSJ. WSJ would reshare it, and readers could support the journalist by contributing a mBTC. WSJ would get a cut and the journalist would get the lion's share.
So how hard would it to be to break a password of say"iFuCkInGHate2001!!" If crackers get hold of the file with the password hashes, nearly all passwords will be cracked, even quite long ones like yours. A similar password (18 printable chars) that has been hashed once with SHA with no salt would take less than an hour to crack on a single PC. Adding salt makes it harder to build tables where you can just look up the password instantly, but no slower to just brute force.
People REALLY need to use 2-factor auth to be secure.
So what can a person like me who doesn't know much on how to make a password more secure, except making it super long and complex to do to " feel safer" of not getting hacked. First, choose reputable services like GMail, where they take security very seriously. A cracker who can't get to the database of password hashes is forced to attempt to log in repeatedly, which can be detected and throttled to a safe rate.
Second, use 2-factor auth if it's available.
Third, use something like LastPass that generates a long random password for each site and stores it encrypted under a single password that you remember. You never type that password into anything online.
I bet your computer is awesome It's a Macbook Pro.
Last updated: 2014-05-09 00:53 UTC
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Bitcoin BTC Adder add 5 btc FBI [WRAY] In SENATE REVEAL SHOCKING THREATS TO USA CLASSIFIED NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN [M]ops The Dysfunctional Nature of BitCoin Buying Bitcoin In United States SingleCoin Bitcoin Wallet

At first, scammers tried to get you to wire them money.Then, they demanded payment with gift cards.Now, scammers are luring people into paying them with Bitcoin – a type of digital money or cryptocurrency.Read on to learn how to spot and avoid some of the top ways scammers are trying to get you to pay with Bitcoin. As a wallet user, you get an address made up of a combination of letters and numbers. This allows you to receive Bitcoin. Every one of these combinations is unique and related to a single wallet. This means that you can preserve your anonymity as long as no one connects your Bitcoin address to your personal details. The FBI is warning that fraudsters are about to unleash a surge of coronavirus cryptocurrency scams. ... The scammer threatens to “infect you and/or your family with coronavirus unless payment is sent to a bitcoin wallet.” Agents advise internet users to employ common sense, verify the legitimacy of vendors, stay away from their bank accounts and report blackmail and extortion attempts to ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation has reportedly revealed that it is working on 130 cryptocurrency-related investigations, citing an increase in illegal activity facilitated by crypto payments. Bitcoin wallets — virtual storage facilities for the most commonly used cryptocurrency — publicly display transactions but not the identities of those making them. Trustwave was able to trace payments to a larger wallet, created in May, that has taken in $100 million in what the company believes is illicit proceeds, Mador said. Not all of that was from data sales, he said.

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Bitcoin BTC Adder add 5 btc

Tonight we talk about the markets & some breaking FBI news involving a popular crypto trading website. Download Beards & Bitcoins Podcast on iTunes & SoundCloud! 🎵iTunes: https://apple.co/2xDl8TK Bitcoin Adder can help u add your bitcoins instantly to your own wallet. With the Bitcoin Adder you can get an unlimited amount of bitcoin. You can use multiple Bitcoin wallet to get BTC on ... Comments are turned off ... Stock volatility continues amid talks of reopening the economy and ugly data Yahoo Finance 480 watching. Live now ; Bitcoin 101 - Intro to Paper Wallets & Cold Storage ... please leave me a tip here /tipjar/ https://www.patreon.com/truthseeker My Bitcoin Wallet Address: 17S5o2Thyqcw9TqtFyQAQdAtjSwJJ95rcE The FBI has obtained ‘i... Sources: Who Owns the World's Biggest Bitcoin Wallet? The FBI, Wired http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/12/fbi_wallet/?cid=15955134 BitCOin Suicide Pr...

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